28.4 C
New York
Monday, July 22, 2024

11 Of The Unusual Wedding Traditions From Around The World

Every couple celebrates their love in different ways, and most times, it is through age-old traditions that they step into the wedding. No matter where you are in the world, marriage traditions, much like other traditions, not only differ from place to place across the globe but can also stun you with their absurdity.

Even though traditions of a wedding differ across the globe, the common thread is the idea of spreading love and happiness. While some wedding traditions and customs may throw you off, others may leave you gobsmacked and some might even seem a little offensive. You’ll be amazed at what happens on wedding days around the world. Thankfully, these traditions are meant to bring good luck and prosperity to the couple. 

Here are some of the weirdest marriage traditions followed around the world:

1. Joota Chupai

On the day of the wedding, in a ritual called “Joota Chupai,” an Indian bride’s mischievous sisters and female cousins make off with the groom’s shoes and demand ‘ransom’ money for their safe return. That’s one way to kick things up a notch!

2. Marrying a Tree FirstIf you're a Hindu woman born during the astrological period when Mars and Saturn are both under the … Read More

If you’re a Hindu woman born during the astrological period when Mars and Saturn are both under the seventh house, you’re cursed; according to custom, if you marry, be prepared for early widowhood. Fortunately, there’s a remedy: Marry a tree first, then have it cut down to break the evil spell.

Read Less3. Crying Ritual

Weddings are often an emotional affair, but in certain parts of China crying is a required part of the preparation for marriage. A month before their forthcoming nuptials, Tujia brides will cry for one hour each day.

4. Face & body blackening

There is a tradition in Scotland where the friends of the bride and groom blacken the would-be-couple with treacle, soot, feathers and flour. They are then made to parade on the streets which is actually meant to ward off evil spirits!

5. Served leftover food

According to the customs of the French, the newlyweds were earlier served with leftover food and drink in a chamber pot, by a guest, which is meant to give the couple wedding night energy. But now, it has been tweaked over the years. They are now given a mix of chocolate and champagne.

6. No bathroom for 3 days straightIn Malaysia and Indonesia, the Tidong people in Borneo do not let the couple use the bathroom for 3 … Read More

In Malaysia and Indonesia, the Tidong people in Borneo do not let the couple use the bathroom for 3 days straight or even leave the house after their wedding. There is in fact a guard who keeps an eye on them and they can eat small amounts of food and drink to survive. This is done for good luck and prevention of breakup or death of their would-be-children.

Read Less7. Kissing the brideSweden has a unique wedding tradition where it is customary for the groom to disappear during the we… Read More

Sweden has a unique wedding tradition where it is customary for the groom to disappear during the wedding ceremony, and leave the bride alone. All the young and unmarried men present at the wedding are then allowed to kiss the bride as part of this very strange ritual. Similarly, the bridesmaids can also kiss the groom. Beginning of a happy marriage or access to an open marriage?

Read Less8. No Smiling on the Wedding Day

Wedding days are supposed to be one of the happiest days of your life. Apparently not in some parts of Congo! Congolese nuptials are not about love, they are serious affairs that take place after two families have negotiated the bride’s “price” and exchanged, most commonly, for livestock.

11. Smashing platesIt is also done as an act of joy. Greeks believe a joyous occasion or celebration also attracts evil spirits, and to ward it off, plates are smashed to indicate that such a violent and aggressive act means no celebration can take place anywhere near.10. Beating the Groom’s Feet

Falaka, or beating the groom’s feet with an old cane or dried fish, usually occurs right before the newlywed can leave with his bride. It’s not malicious and is usually done in good fun, with wedding guests taking turns and even quizzing the groom’s knowledge as he’s beaten.

Related Articles

Latest Articles